MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

Home All New Browse Search About

...
Our Feynman Who Art in Heaven... (2007)
Paul Di Filippo
(click on names to see more mathematical fiction by the same author)
...

Contributed by "William E. Emba"

A religious cult based on the Standard Model (of high energy physics) has its headquarters in a tesseract.

This story, which is certainly more physical than mathematical, appears in the "Plumage from Pegasus" column in the February 2007 issue of Fantasy and Science Fiction and is available for free at their website.

More information about this work can be found at www.sfsite.com.
(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Our Feynman Who Art in Heaven...
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. The Pythagoras Problem by Trevor Baxendale
  2. La formule: (A story of fourth dimension) by Jean Ray
  3. Perturbation - For Nature Computes On A Straight Line (In Seven Balancing Acts) by Vijay Fafat
  4. Into the Fourth by Adam Hull Shirk
  5. The Mandelbrot Bet by Dirk Strasser
  6. Gold Dust and Star Dust by Cyrill Wates
  7. A Modern Comedy of Science by Issac Nathanson
  8. The Mobius Trail by George Smith
  9. The Moebius Room by Robert Donald Locke
  10. Project Flatty by Irving Cox Jr.
Ratings for Our Feynman Who Art in Heaven...:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
1/5 (1 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
3/5 (1 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreScience Fiction,
MotifHigher/Lower Dimensions, Religion,
TopicGeometry/Topology/Trigonometry, Mathematical Physics,
MediumShort Stories, Available Free Online,

Home All New Browse Search About

Exciting News: The total number of works of mathematical fiction listed in this database recently reached a milestone. The 1,500th entry is The Man of Forty Crowns by Voltaire. Thanks to Vijay Fafat for writing the summary of that work (and so many others). I am also grateful to everyone who has contributed to this website. Heck, I'm grateful to everyone who visited the site. Thank you!

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)