MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Le théorème de Travolta (2002)
Olivier Courcelle
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Contributed by Olivier Gerard

The adventures of a young mathematician trapped in the curious and delirious world of a mathematical congress. A cross between David Lodge and Groucho Marx.

I believe it has not been translated into english (but should)

Contributed by Anonymous

Very funny description of the mathematical world. Excellently written. Delirious.

More information about this work can be found at www.amazon.fr.
(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Le théorème de Travolta
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Arithmetic Town / Arithmetic by Todd McEwen
  2. Bellwether by Connie Willis
  3. Flatterland: like Flatland, only more so by Ian Stewart
  4. Doctor Who: The Turing Test by Paul Leonard
  5. Men at Arms by Terry Pratchett
  6. The Mirror Has Two Faces by Barbra Streisand (director) / Richard LaGravenese (Writer)
  7. Quicksilver: The Baroque Cycle Volume 1 by Neal Stephenson
  8. The Anomaly [L'Anomalie] by Hervé Le Tellier
  9. Dr. No: A Novel by Percival Everett
  10. Geometric Regional Novel by Gert Jonke
Ratings for Le théorème de Travolta:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
2/5 (1 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
4/5 (1 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreHumorous,
MotifAcademia,
Topic
MediumNovels,

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Exciting News: The total number of works of mathematical fiction listed in this database recently reached a milestone. The 1,500th entry is The Man of Forty Crowns by Voltaire. Thanks to Vijay Fafat for writing the summary of that work (and so many others). I am also grateful to everyone who has contributed to this website. Heck, I'm grateful to everyone who visited the site. Thank you!

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)