MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Stand-In (1937)
Tay Garnett
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Leslie Howard plays a typical Hollywood mathematical genius: emotionless, conceited, and convinced that everything can be understood through mathematics. (Well, one out of three isn't bad!) It takes a trip to Tinsel Town and a beautiful actress to make him see the errors of his ways.

More information about this work can be found at www.imdb.com.
(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Stand-In
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Slightly Perfect / Are you with it? by George Malcolm-Smith (Novel) / Sam Perrin (Script) / George Balzer (Script)
  2. She Wrote the Book by Oscar Brodney (writer) / Warren Wilson (writer) / Charles Lamont (director)
  3. Erasmus with Freckles [aka Dear Brigitte] by John Haase
  4. The Helpline by Katherine Collette
  5. The Mirror Has Two Faces by Barbra Streisand (director) / Richard LaGravenese (Writer)
  6. A Matter of Geometry by Ared White
  7. Kazohinia [A Voyage to Kazohinia] by Sándor Szathmári
  8. Porter Piper by Anonymous
  9. Scandal in the Fourth Dimension by Amelia Reynolds Long (as "A.R. Long")
  10. Say Wen by Ellis Parker Butler
Ratings for Stand-In:
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(unrated)

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Categories:
GenreHumorous,
MotifAnti-social Mathematicians, Math as Cold/Dry/Useless, Romance,
TopicMathematical Finance,
MediumFilms,

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Exciting News: The total number of works of mathematical fiction listed in this database recently reached a milestone. The 1,500th entry is The Man of Forty Crowns by Voltaire. Thanks to Vijay Fafat for writing the summary of that work (and so many others). I am also grateful to everyone who has contributed to this website. Heck, I'm grateful to everyone who visited the site. Thank you!

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)