MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Nanunculus (1997)
Ian Watson
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A mathematician wishes to commit suicide, but is pestered by an automated visitor from the future programmed to make certain that the mathematician discovers the key to time travel before he does.

Appears in the collection The Great Escape and first published in Interzone January 1997.

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Works Similar to Nanunculus
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. The Whole Mess by Jack Skillingstead
  2. One Word Kill by Mark Lawrence
  3. Limited Wish by Mark Lawrence
  4. The Janus Equation by Steven G. Spruill
  5. Oracle by Greg Egan
  6. The Writing on the Wall by Steve Stanton
  7. La formule: (A story of fourth dimension) by Jean Ray
  8. Emmy's Time by Anthony Bonato
  9. The Mandelbrot Bet by Dirk Strasser
  10. I’ll Follow The Sun by Paul Di Filippo
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Categories:
GenreScience Fiction,
MotifTime Travel,
Topic
MediumShort Stories,

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Exciting News: The total number of works of mathematical fiction listed in this database recently reached a milestone. The 1,500th entry is The Man of Forty Crowns by Voltaire. Thanks to Vijay Fafat for writing the summary of that work (and so many others). I am also grateful to everyone who has contributed to this website. Heck, I'm grateful to everyone who visited the site. Thank you!

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)