MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Author includes the word(s): Robert A. Heinlein

7 matches found out of 1252 entries

(Note: This page not the entire list of works of Mathematical Fiction. To see the whole list, click here.)

And He Built a Crooked House (1940)
Highly Rated!
Robert A. Heinlein
A clever architect designs a house in the shape of the shadow of a tesseract, but it collapses (through the 4th dimension) when an earthquake shakes it into a more stable form (which takes up very... (more)
Blowups Happen (1940)
Robert A. Heinlein
A mathematician discovers that his formulas predict that an important new power station poses an extremely grave risk to humanity, and he must convince others of the danger. reprinted in THE PAST... (more)
Misfit (1939)
Robert A. Heinlein
A crew of misfits ships out to the asteroid belt. One member turns out to be a misfit among the misfits: he's a mathematical prodigy. His skills prove to be very valuable. reprinted in THE PAST... (more)
The Number of the Beast (1979)
Robert A. Heinlein
Engineer and physicist Jacob Burroughs invents a time machine which lets him travel to what we might consider "alternate universes". The underlying mathematics involves the notion that there are in... (more)
The Rolling Stones (1952)
Robert A. Heinlein
The Stone family goes off on a working tour across the solar system. As a condition for going, the father insists the twins keep up with their higher mathematics studies, which gets referred to explicitly several times. The difference between arithmetic and geometric growth is commented on when their pet "flat cat" reproduces 8 at a time, and faster than expected. (more)
Starman Jones (1953)
Robert A. Heinlein
These adventures of Max Jones, a boy who runs away from Ozark home and works his way up the ranks of a starship is a nice example of classical science fiction as well as being a bit mathematical. The... (more)
The Year of the Jackpot (1952)
Robert A. Heinlein
A statistician notices trends in everything from war and famine to women unexpectedly stripping off their clothes in public. He concludes that the year 1954 is going to be an exceptionally bad year. ... (more)

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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)