MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Fractions (2011)
Buzz Mauro
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A math teacher realizes that the father of one of his students is a man with whom he has had an anonymous sexual relationship. There is some discussion of math education in general, and about hypothetical questions involving fractions in particular (e.g. "Say one-third of the kids in the room have brown eyes and one-half have blue eyes—what fraction would have eyes that are neither brown nor blue?"). However, the story is less mathematical than it may at first seem since the father's response, seemingly about mathematics, is not actually about mathematics at all.

Published in Willow Springs (#67, Spring 2011).

More information about this work can be found at willowsprings.ewu.edu.
(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Fractions
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Twenty-seven Uses for Imaginary Numbers by Buzz Mauro
  2. The Indian Clerk by David Leavitt
  3. Zero by Buzz Mauro
  4. Long Division by Buzz Mauro
  5. The Last Theorem by Buzz Mauro
  6. Continuity by Buzz Mauro
  7. The One Plus One by Jojo Moyes
  8. Long Division by Michael Redhill
  9. Stay Close, Little Ghost by Oliver Serang
  10. In the Light of What We Know by Zia Haider Rahman
Ratings for Fractions:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
1/5 (1 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
4/5 (1 votes)
..

Categories:
Genre
MotifMath Education,
Topic
MediumShort Stories, Available Free Online,

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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)