MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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The Mathematician Repents (2004)
Estep Nagy
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A short story (?) in which Paul Erdős wakes up in the home of a Parisian mathematician, seems a bit confused, wanders around, and says some strange things. No real math is discussed in the story, but of course Erdős was a real mathematician.

I'm not absolutely sure this one is fiction. This could theoretically be a description of fact, though it reads more like a short story. (It seems odd to me for someone to have written a story about a real person who had not even been dead 10 years at the time it was written.) If anyone knows more than I do about its origins, please let me know.

Originally published in Southwest Review 89 no1 37-46 2004.

(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to The Mathematician Repents
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. The Central Tendency by Daniel Kaysen
  2. Of Mystery There Is No End by Leonard Michaels
  3. The Arnold Proof by Jessica Francis Kane
  4. Long Division by Michael Redhill
  5. Satisfactory Proof by Cynthia Morrison Phoel
  6. Kavita Through Glass by Emily Ishem Raboteau
  7. Belonging to Karovsky by Kathryn Schwille
  8. Zilkowski's Theorem by Karl Iagnemma
  9. Life of Pi by Yann Martel
  10. Cryptology by Leonard Michaels
Ratings for The Mathematician Repents:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
1/5 (1 votes)
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Literary Quality:
4/5 (1 votes)
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Categories:
Genre
MotifReal Mathematicians,
Topic
MediumShort Stories,

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May 2016: I am experimenting with a new feature which will print a picture of the cover and a link to the Amazon.com page for a work of mathematical fiction when it is available. I hope you find this useful and convenient. In any case, please write to let me know if it is because I would be happy to either get rid of it or improve it if that would be better for you. Thanks! -Alex

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)