MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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A Game of Consequences (1998)
David Langford
(click on names to see more mathematical fiction by the same author)
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Two reckless researchers at "The Mathematics Institute" undertake dangerous "quantum" research based on mathematical mumbo-jumbo like "translating her mathematical intuitions into appropriate quasi-shapes and pseudo-angles for Ranjit's algorithmic probes".

First published in Starlight 2 (1998) edited by PAtrick Nielsen Hayden. An old PDF copy seems to still be available at the link above and below.

More information about this work can be found at www.itks-training.com:8888.
(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to A Game of Consequences
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Diaspora by Greg Egan
  2. White Mars : or, the mind set free : a 21st Century Utopia by Brian Wilson Aldiss / Roger Penrose
  3. Dark as Day by Charles Sheffield
  4. The Planck Dive by Greg Egan
  5. River of Gods by Ian McDonald
  6. The God Patent by Ransom Stephens
  7. Border Guards by Greg Egan
  8. Ripples in the Dirac Sea by Geoffrey A. Landis
  9. Ouroboros by Geoffrey A. Landis
  10. The Hollow Man by Dan Simmons
Ratings for A Game of Consequences:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
2/5 (1 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
2/5 (1 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreScience Fiction,
MotifFemale Mathematicians,
TopicMathematical Physics,
MediumShort Stories,

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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)