MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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God and Stephen Hawking (2000)
Robin Hawdon
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Although most people know him as a "scientist", Stephen Hawking is probably the best known living mathematician. (Technically, he is the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University.) This play examines his life and work.

More information about this work can be found at archive.oxfordmail.net.
(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to God and Stephen Hawking
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Newton's Hooke by David Pinner
  2. Partition by Ira Hauptman
  3. Hypatia by Mac Wellman
  4. The Five Hysterical Girls Theorem by Rinne Groff
  5. Incompleteness by Apostolos Doxiadis
  6. Proof by David Auburn (playwright)
  7. Calculus (Newton's Whores) by Carl Djerassi
  8. Oracle by Greg Egan
  9. Welcome to Paradise by Paul David-Goddard / Helen Miller
  10. Gut Symmetries by Jeanette Winterson
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Categories:
Genre
MotifReal Mathematicians, Religion,
TopicMathematical Physics, Real Mathematics,
MediumPlays,

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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)