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Aniara (1956)
Harry Martinson

Contributed by "William E. Emba"

Aniara is considered one of the greatest works of Swedish author Harry Martinson, 1974 Nobel Prize in Literature co-winner "for writings that catch the dewdrop and reflect the cosmos". It is an epic science fiction poem in 103 cantos, telling the story of the space ship Aniara and its occupants, 8000 evacuees from a doomed Earth. Headed to Mars, they were forced to take evasive action and are trapped on a one-way trip headed out of the solar system.

Cantos 39, 45 and 47 are explicitly mathematical, with references to calculations and aleph-numbers.

Aniara has been adapted to opera. The first complete translation in English was published in Sweden in 1991. A revised version of this translation was published in the US in 1999 by Story Line Press.

More information about this work can be found at
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Works Similar to Aniara
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  10. Gomez by Cyril M. Kornbluth
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GenreScience Fiction,

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