MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Big Numbers (1990)
Alan Moore / Bill Sienkiewicz
(click on names to see more mathematical fiction by the same author)
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This comic book (written by Moore and illustrated by Sienkiewicz) was planned as a 12 issue series with a mathematics theme. Unfortunately, due to a lack of cooperation by the artist (and also a substitute artist) the series never got past issue 2. Rumors suggest that Moore may be arranging a television mini-series of Big Numbers.

Contributed by Marco Abate

Unfortunately never completed, this story would have combined chaos theory, the Mandelbrot set and ordinary life in Northampton, UK. The first two issues are fascinating and tantalizing; who knows what the whole work would have been if completed.

(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Big Numbers
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Tre per zero by T. Sclavi (writer) / B. Brindisi (artist)
  2. Strange Attractors by Charles Soule (author) / Greg Scott (Illustrator)
  3. 1963 by Alan Moore
  4. Numbercruncher by Si Spurrier (writer) / PJ Holden (artist)
  5. Il Lemma di Levemberg by Marco Abate (writer) / S. Natali (artist)
  6. The Adventures of Topology Man by Alex Kasman
  7. It was the Monster from the Fourth Dimension by Al Feldstein
  8. Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
  9. Feigenbaum Number by Nancy Kress
  10. Strange Attractors by William Sleator
Ratings for Big Numbers:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
1.5/5 (2 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
4/5 (2 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreScience Fiction,
Motif
TopicChaos/Fractals,
MediumComic Book,

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Your Help Needed: Some site visitors remember reading works of mathematical fiction that neither they nor I can identify. It is time to crowdsource this problem and ask for your help! You would help a neighbor find a missing pet...can't you also help a fellow site visitor find some missing works of mathematical fiction? Please take a look and let us know if you have seen these missing stories anywhere!.

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)