MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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The Monopole Affair (2003)
Ken Wharton
(click on names to see more mathematical fiction by the same author)
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This short story in the May 2003 issue of Analog by physicist Wharton includes references to the role of higher dimensions in string theory.

Contributed by Sarah-Marie Belcastro

References to string theory, but much more about physics than math (which gets a passing mention).

(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to The Monopole Affair
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Diamond Dogs by Alistair Reynolds
  2. The Grass and Tree by Eliot Fintushel
  3. Six Thought Experiments Concerning the Nature of Computation by Rudy Rucker
  4. A Deadly Medley of Smedley by Feargus Gwynplaine MacIntyre
  5. Boltzmann's Ghost by Ken Wharton
  6. Unreasonable Effectiveness by Alex Kasman
  7. The Plattner Story by Herbert George Wells
  8. Technical Error by Arthur C. Clarke
  9. Tiger by the Tail by A.G. Nourse
  10. The Fourth-Dimensional Demonstrator by Murray Leinster
Ratings for The Monopole Affair:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
1/5 (1 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
3/5 (1 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreScience Fiction,
MotifHigher/Lower Dimensions,
TopicMathematical Physics,
MediumShort Stories,

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May 2016: I am experimenting with a new feature which will print a picture of the cover and a link to the Amazon.com page for a work of mathematical fiction when it is available. I hope you find this useful and convenient. In any case, please write to let me know if it is because I would be happy to either get rid of it or improve it if that would be better for you. Thanks! -Alex

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)