MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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The Company of Strangers (2001)
Robert Wilson
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A bittersweet romance/thriller about a young woman mathematician in Portugal spying for the British during World War II. There is a lot of interesting stuff in this novel if you're looking at the romance or the history (especially the attempts of the Nazis to develop nuclear weapons), but as far as math goes I'm afraid there's not much more than a few uninspired descriptions of why our heroine chose to go into mathematics.

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(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to The Company of Strangers
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Sekret Enigmy by Roman Wionczek
  2. Sebastian by David Greene (director)
  3. Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
  4. Enigma by Robert Harris / Tom Stoppard
  5. Mr. Churchill's Secretary by Susan Elia MacNeal
  6. En busca de Klingsor (In Search of Klingsor) by Jorge Volpi
  7. The Imitation Game by Morten Tyldum (director) / Graham Moore (screenplay)
  8. The Lost Books of the Odyssey by Zachary Mason
  9. The Eight by Katherine Neville
  10. The Kingdom of Ohio by Matthew Flaming
Ratings for The Company of Strangers:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
1/5 (1 votes)
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Literary Quality:
3/5 (1 votes)
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Categories:
GenreHistorical Fiction, Adventure/Espionage,
MotifWar,
Topic
MediumNovels,

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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)