MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Ylem (1994)
Eliot Fintushel
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Contributed by "William E. Emba"

Another Fintushel Big-Bang-And-Back Totally-Weird adventure, the plot concerns a business conflict in the helium market. Somebody dickered with the primordial nucleosynthesis, and somebody else wants to change it back.

Explicit algebra, with commentary, involving Hubble's constant shows up as part of an explanation of what is happening at one point.

`Ylem', by the way, is the Primordial Stuff of the universe, according to Norse mythology. The word was used by George Gamow as part of the Big Bang model, but it never caught on.

Appeared in ASIMOV'S (Oct 94) pp 10-35. ("De Rerum" in ABORIGINAL SCIENCE FICTION is a sequel.)

(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Ylem
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Fillet of Man by Eliot Fintushel
  2. Herbrand's Conjecture and the White Sox Scandal by Eliot Fintushel
  3. Hamisch in Avalon by Eliot Fintushel
  4. The Grass and Tree by Eliot Fintushel
  5. Izzy at the Lucky Three by Eliot Fintushel
  6. Ripples in the Dirac Sea by Geoffrey A. Landis
  7. The Planck Dive by Greg Egan
  8. Border Guards by Greg Egan
  9. The Writing on the Wall by Steve Stanton
  10. Milo and Sylvie by Eliot Fintushel
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Categories:
GenreScience Fiction,
MotifTime Travel,
TopicAlgebra/Arithmetic/Number Theory, Mathematical Physics,
MediumShort Stories,

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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)