MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

Home All New Browse Search About

...
Touch the Water, Touch the Wind (1972)
Amos Oz
...
Note: This work of mathematical fiction is recommended by Alex for literati.

Amos Oz, the famous Israeli author and political activist, wrote this mathematical, musical and mystical novel about a Holocaust survivor who proves a terribly important theorem about "infinity" while working on a kibbutz in Israel. Although we don't learn much about the theorem itself, we see how the theorem's discoverer and the rest of the world react to the new result. We also catch a glimpse of the strangely mystical world in which these characters live and learn about how math is really like music.

Buy this work of mathematical fiction and read reviews at amazon.com. Amazon.com logo
(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Touch the Water, Touch the Wind
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Orpheus Lost: A Novel by Janette Turner Hospital
  2. Three Days and a Child by Abraham B. Yehoshua
  3. The Blue Door by Tanya Barfield
  4. Strange Attractors by Rebecca Goldstein
  5. The Memory of Whiteness by Kim Stanley Robinson
  6. Habitus by James Flint
  7. The Visiting Professor by Robert Littell
  8. Partition by Ira Hauptman
  9. Aurora in Four Voices by Catherine Asaro
  10. Continuums by Robert Carr
Ratings for Touch the Water, Touch the Wind:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
2.5/5 (6 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
4.5/5 (6 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreHistorical Fiction, Fantasy,
MotifProving Theorems, Music,
TopicInfinity,
MediumNovels,

Home All New Browse Search About

Your Help Needed: Some site visitors remember reading works of mathematical fiction that neither they nor I can identify. It is time to crowdsource this problem and ask for your help! You would help a neighbor find a missing pet...can't you also help a fellow site visitor find some missing works of mathematical fiction? Please take a look and let us know if you have seen these missing stories anywhere!.

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)