MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

Home All New Browse Search About

...
Twisters (1988)
Paul J. Nahin
(click on names to see more mathematical fiction by the same author)
...

A medical doctor stumbles onto a dangerous trap in this short story which was published in Analog (Vol CVIII No 6, May 1988). The twisted donuts sold by the new shop he passes on the way to work turn out to be Klein bottles (a topological oddity like the Mobius strip).

(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Twisters
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Spacetime Donuts by Rudy Rucker
  2. The Adventures of Topology Man by Alex Kasman
  3. Message Found in a Copy of Flatland by Rudy Rucker
  4. A Deadly Medley of Smedley by Feargus Gwynplaine MacIntyre
  5. The Infinite Plane by Paul J. Nahin
  6. The Girl with the Celestial Limb by Pauline Melville
  7. The Mathenauts by Norman Kagan
  8. Inside Out by Rudy Rucker
  9. The Holmes-Ginsbook Device by Isaac Asimov
  10. A New Golden Age by Rudy Rucker
Ratings for Twisters:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
2/5 (1 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
1/5 (1 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreHumorous, Science Fiction,
MotifMobius Strip/Nonorientability,
TopicGeometry/Topology/Trigonometry,
MediumShort Stories,

Home All New Browse Search About

May 2016: I am experimenting with a new feature which will print a picture of the cover and a link to the Amazon.com page for a work of mathematical fiction when it is available. I hope you find this useful and convenient. In any case, please write to let me know if it is because I would be happy to either get rid of it or improve it if that would be better for you. Thanks! -Alex

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)