MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Algorithms and Nasal Structures (1998)
Lois H. Gresh
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Contributed by "William E. Emba"

This short story appears "in Aboriginal Science Fiction, Summer 1998. CS grad student is having trouble programming sheep odors. The story competently uses real programming terminology (stacks, queues, etc). Includes a wee bit of trigonometry.

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Works Similar to Algorithms and Nasal Structures
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Forgotten Milestones in Computing No. 7: The Quenderghast Bullian Algebraic Calculator by Alex Stewart
  2. The Planck Dive by Greg Egan
  3. Antibodies by Charles Stross
  4. Transition Dreams by Greg Egan
  5. Border Guards by Greg Egan
  6. The Logic Pool by Stephen Baxter
  7. Conceiving Ada by Lynn Hershman-Leeson
  8. Aurora in Four Voices by Catherine Asaro
  9. Nuremberg Joys by Charles Sheffield
  10. Imaginary Numbers : An Anthology of Marvelous Mathematical Stories, Diversions, Poems, and Musings by William Frucht (editor)
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Categories:
GenreScience Fiction,
Motif
TopicComputers/Cryptography,
MediumShort Stories,

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May 2016: I am experimenting with a new feature which will print a picture of the cover and a link to the Amazon.com page for a work of mathematical fiction when it is available. I hope you find this useful and convenient. In any case, please write to let me know if it is because I would be happy to either get rid of it or improve it if that would be better for you. Thanks! -Alex

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)