MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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The Holmes-Ginsbook Device (1969)
Isaac Asimov
(click on names to see more mathematical fiction by the same author)
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Contributed by "William E. Emba"

A scientist recounts how, stung by his former professor hogging all the credit for figuring out a way to safely light cigarettes and girlwatch at the same time, he and a collaborator (using geometry and topology) beat him in the race to read and girlwatch at the same time.

(For those not in the know, it is a parody of James Watson THE DOUBLE HELIX.)

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(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to The Holmes-Ginsbook Device
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. The Accidental Time Machine by Joe Haldeman
  2. The Mathenauts by Norman Kagan
  3. The Adventures of Topology Man by Alex Kasman
  4. The Tale of the Big Computer (aka The End of Man?) by Hannes Alfven (writing as Olof Johannesson)
  5. Quanto scommettiamo ("How much do you want to bet?") by Italo Calvino
  6. The Pacifist by Arthur C. Clarke
  7. Ms Fnd in a Lbry by Hal Draper
  8. Unreasonable Effectiveness by Alex Kasman
  9. Message Found in a Copy of Flatland by Rudy Rucker
  10. No-Sided Professor by Martin Gardner
Ratings for The Holmes-Ginsbook Device:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
1/5 (1 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
3/5 (1 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreHumorous, Science Fiction,
Motif
TopicGeometry/Topology/Trigonometry,
MediumShort Stories,

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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)