MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Sixty Million Trillion Combinations (1980)
Isaac Asimov
(click on names to see more mathematical fiction by the same author)
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Tom Trumbull, one of Asimov's regular "Black Widower" mystery characters, wants to convince an eccentric mathematician (working on Goldbach's conjecture) that his secret password is not safe. Combinatorics plays a role. See also these [1, 3] other BW stories.

Contributed by Jose Brox

A Black Widowers short story with some interesting dialogues, but with a quite dumb and out-of-the-blue ending solution that spoiled out the fun for me

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(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to Sixty Million Trillion Combinations
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Getting the Combination by Isaac Asimov
  2. Go, Little Book by Isaac Asimov
  3. The Nine Billion Names of God by Arthur C. Clarke
  4. Mirror Image by Isaac Asimov
  5. No One You Know by Michelle Richmond
  6. Fermat's Room (La Habitacion de Fermat) by Luis Piedrahita / Rodrigo SopeƱa
  7. The Ultimate Crime by Isaac Asimov
  8. Child's Play by Isaac Asimov
  9. Lewis (Episode: Whom the Gods Would Destroy) by Daniel Boyle (Screenwriter)
  10. Pythagorean Crimes by Tefcros Michaelides
Ratings for Sixty Million Trillion Combinations:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
Mathematical Content:
4/5 (3 votes)
..
Literary Quality:
3/5 (3 votes)
..

Categories:
GenreMystery,
Motif
Topic
MediumShort Stories,

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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)