MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

Home All New Browse Search About

...
The Forever Marriage (2012)
Ann Bauer
...

The unlikeable and unfaithful wife of a math professor only learns to appreciate the husband she never loved after his untimely death. The mathematician is humble but otherwise stereotypically brilliant (offered full professorships immediately upon receiving his PhD), unemotional and unromantic.

Buy this work of mathematical fiction and read reviews at amazon.com. Amazon.com logo
(Note: This is just one work of mathematical fiction from the list. To see the entire list or to see more works of mathematical fiction, return to the Homepage.)

Works Similar to The Forever Marriage
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. I Married You for Happiness by Lily Tuck
  2. The Art Student's War by Brad Leithauser
  3. A Doubter's Almanac by Ethan Canin
  4. Coincidence by J.W. Ironmonger
  5. Stay Close, Little Ghost by Oliver Serang
  6. The Proof of Love by Catherine Hall
  7. The Capacity for Infinite Happiness by Alexis von Konigslow
  8. Casebook by Mona Simpson
  9. The Happy Numbers of Julius Miles by Jim Keeble
  10. In the Light of What We Know by Zia Haider Rahman
Ratings for The Forever Marriage:
RatingsHave you seen/read this work of mathematical fiction? Then click here to enter your own votes on its mathematical content and literary quality or send me comments to post on this Webpage.
(unrated)

PLEASE HELP US OUT BY ENTERING YOUR OWN RATINGS FOR THIS WORK.

Categories:
Genre
MotifAcademia, Romance,
Topic
MediumNovels,

Home All New Browse Search About

May 2016: I am experimenting with a new feature which will print a picture of the cover and a link to the Amazon.com page for a work of mathematical fiction when it is available. I hope you find this useful and convenient. In any case, please write to let me know if it is because I would be happy to either get rid of it or improve it if that would be better for you. Thanks! -Alex

(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)