MATHEMATICAL FICTION:

a list compiled by Alex Kasman (College of Charleston)

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Rincorse (1994)
Dario Voltolini
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Contributed by Michele Benzi, Emory University

The title means "Run-ups" in Italian. The book tells the story of a young, talented mathematician who travels trough Italy interviewing for jobs at various companies. During one of the interviews he tells a skeptical would-be employer, an engineer, about his thesis on the structure of symplectic groups; he also describes his computer skills, the only ones that the employer might have any actual interest in.

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Works Similar to Rincorse
According to my `secret formula', the following works of mathematical fiction are similar to this one:
  1. Morte di un matematico napoletano by Mario Martone (director)
  2. Ultima Dea [The Last Goddess] by Gianni Riotta
  3. Hickory Dickory Shock! The Tale of Techies by Sundip Gorai
  4. Geometria dell'apocalisse by Marco Abate (writer) / R. Bogagni (artist)
  5. Il Lemma di Levemberg by Marco Abate (writer) / S. Natali (artist)
  6. La formula di Ramanujan by Marco Abate (writer) / P. Ongaro (artist)
  7. I padroni del caos by A. Russo (writer) / Esposito~Brothers (artists)
  8. La fiamma sul ghiaccio (The Flame on the Ice) by Umberto Marino (director)
  9. Good Benito by Alan P. Lightman
  10. Division by Zero by Ted Chiang
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(Maintained by Alex Kasman, College of Charleston)